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The 7 Principles For Making A Strong Argument

Dr. Andrew CorbettWhat makes for a strong argument? It becomes very important during election campaigns and public debates to be able to distinguish a strong argument from a weak one. Of course, issues of public debate don’t always involve matters of Public Policy. Strong or weak arguments also happen when people discuss matters matters of history, parenting, religion, or the arts. Here’s some things which might help you to distinguish a strong argument from a weak one.

A strong argument – 

  1.  Is based on reason rather than assertions.
  2.  Shows respect for differing points of view rather than ridiculing their proponents.
  3.  Resonates with what is known to be true.
  4.  Is not built upon an emotional argument. (For example, “If you don’t agree with me I will be very sad.”)
  5.  It distinguishes the issue from the personalities involved.
  6.  Might be able to be put simply, but it can rarely be reduced to a mere slogan.
  7.  Is not grounded in who is making it, or how many agree with it. 

InterviewingThe next time there is an election, political campaign, family disagreement, or Public Policy debate, consider who is making the strongest argument before casting your vote or making up your mind one way or another. And if you are seeking to persuade others to your way of thinking consider how you could frame your argument around these seven guidelines to making a strong argument.

Dr. Andrew Corbett

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